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May-June Issue


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May-June Issue


Evo Singapore May-Jun 2018

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On sale now!
 

4WD Mega Test 

Supercar 4x4s, that is, not off-roaders! In this issue we pitch AWD grip from the latest Audi RS4 and S1 Quattro against their exotic AWD coounterparts, the Lamborghini Aventador S, Honda NSX, Mercedes-AMG E63 S and Ford Focus RS.

Porsche 911 GT3 vs Lotus Evora GT430

Can Lotus’ hardcore supercar offer any resistance against the very best that Stuttgart has to offer? We head to the twisty roads of Wales for a no-holds barred back to back shootout.

 

READ MORE

 

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Honda Civic Type R


Honda Civic Type R


evo CAR OF THE YEAR: HOT HATCH

HONDA CIVIC TYPE R

Capable, engaging, useable, practical and good value – few hot hatches are as complete as the Civic Type R

by John Barker  
Photography by Malcolm Griffiths

 

No one is unmoved by the Civic. It’s as brash and bold as the Golf R is subtle and demure. With its mahoosive hoop spoiler, it’s like a throwback to the days when Imprezas and Evos ruled the practical performance car world. Kids go nuts for its lairiness, but some grown-ups who can choose a fast hatch simply won’t consider the Honda because of how it looks.
Which is a great shame because in doing so, they deny themselves one of the great fast hatch experiences. We rate the Golf R very highly, and we like the Focus RS too, but the Civic Type R transcends them; it is astonishingly good, not simply in what it does but how it feels and, ergo, how it makes you feel.
The Type R drives like all the spoilers and body extensions and scoops say it will – like a track car. Its steering is direct, slack-free and beefy, its chassis has a tautness that suggests a bias for smooth, warm asphalt, and its brakes bite right from the top of the pedal. All of which makes it sound like everyday comfort and usability has been sacrificed for that record front-wheel-drive Nürburgring lap time, right?
Wrong. Over your first few miles of craggy B-road, the Civic treads so deftly, so calmly, that you can’t help but smile; you are witnessing something remarkable, something that will
stay with you. The last time this happened for me in this
class was when I drove the Renault Sport Mégane R26.R,
and it was for the same reasons: wonderfully engaging and precise handling and a superb ride. Like the Mégane, the
Civic makes every drive a joy, any corner an opportunity to experience a little magic.

 
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Great seats, great steering, great gearshift – there’s so much that feels so right from the Civic’s driver’s seat.

 Exterior styling is perhaps a little less easy to love, but if you’re not a fan, we urge you to look beyond it.

Exterior styling is perhaps a little less easy to love, but if you’re not a fan, we urge you to look beyond it.

‘I love how the chassis is never fazed yet isn’t aloof,’ says deputy editor Adam Towler. ‘It steers really well, puts its power down cleanly, and even the brakes are exemplary. It’s a great example of how the Ring can be a positive influence.’
Quite. Commit the Type R hard to a warm, dry corner and you’ll feel it slice immediately for the apex – no response lag, no tyre slip – and if you then give it full throttle it will simply accelerate. No wheelspin, no widening of the line and absolutely no corruption through the steering wheel. It is amazing. And the turbo engine is a gem, too, managing to sound and feel like a gutsy naturally aspirated in-line four with a thrilling top end.
The stripped-out R26.R delivered incredible grip with the help of slick-like (and noisy) trackday tyres, but the Honda uses regular Continentals. Super-low-profile SportContacts, granted, but they work pretty well in the cold and wet. And this Honda has all the space and kit you could wish for, and it’s refined, too. In fact, as a family car the only thing it lacks is a belt for the middle seat in the back.
‘What I love most of all about it is the way it can be so many things, sometimes all at the same time,’ adds Towler. ‘That’s the essence of a great hot hatch for me, and is what lifts the Type R above more specialised examples like the Mégane and Golf Clubsport S.’
Road test editor James Disdale agrees: ‘Even a short drive will leave you open-mouthed at what Honda has managed to squeeze out of what is essentially a humble family hatchback. Yet ability doesn’t come at the expense of character because the Type R is as fun as it is fast. Bullseye!’
The seats are superb and low slung, the gearshift snappy, the pedal spacing spot on, the throttle response pretty good. And it never lets up, ruthlessly exposing weaknesses in the opposition that you didn’t realise were there. In our Supertest it had little trouble beating the fancied Focus RS and the SEAT Leon Cupra 300, trouncing them on both road and track.
Remarkably, there is no Type R department at Honda like there is AMG at Mercedes or M GmbH at BMW. The credit for this car goes to project leader Hideki Kakinuma and the small team he hand-picked from the business. And one of the reasons this model is more complete than the last is that this time the Type R team was in on development of the base Civic from the start.
Managing editor Ian Eveleigh drove the previous-generation Type R as a long-term test car: ‘I had worried that the FK8, with its aim to be more useable, might wipe away some of the character of the more raw FK2, but not a bit of it. The rough edges have been polished away – not least the overly harsh ride – but it’s actually made for an even better driving experience.’
Polished is just the word to describe the Civic. It’s not just what this Type R does but how it does it that makes it so compelling. It feels like it has been obsessively developed and honed to great depth by people who know what they are doing and exactly what they want to achieve. This exceptional level of finesse is a quality shared by all evo five-star cars, and it’s amazing that you can enjoy such rare brilliance as this price point.
‘It’s remarkably good value,’ says Towler. ‘You get a car that will nudge hit 270km/h, stay with just about anything on the road, look after the novice driver but involve the experienced, feel completely at home on a trackday without so much as a tweak of anything, seat four in comfort, offer a generously sized boot, be entirely useable every day…’
It’s such a complete package that you wonder how Honda does it for the money. Dynamically, the Golf R is also very polished, and the Focus RS is more powerful and entertainingly oversteery, which can be fun. But by some margin the mad-looking Civic is the daddy. So good, in fact, that you’d be mad to ignore it.

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HONDA CIVIC TYPE R

Engine            In-line 4-cyl, 1996cc, turbo
Power              320hp @ 6500rpm  
Torque            400Nm @ 2500-4500rpm
Weight            1380kg (233bhp/ton)   
0-100km/h     5.8sec (claimed)  
Top speed        272km/h (claimed)  
Basic price      $194,999 with COE
VES Band        C2 (+$20,000)
evo rating        5 stars

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HOT HATCH HIGHLY COMMENDED

Among the many go-faster family machines are a couple of standout performers in the form of the Volkswagen Golf R and the Hyundai i30 N (below). While the presence of the former here will come as no surprise, the inclusion of the latter is likely to raise a few eyebrows. Yet as we discovered in evo, the superheated Hyundai is something of a revelation. Grippy, poised and hugely entertaining, the i30 N is a serious piece of kit that deserves your attention. If it was a little less flabby on the scales and had an engine with a heftier punch (it currently has 275hp in Performance Package spec), then the N could have toppled the Honda.
By contrast, the VW Golf R (above) is a very different type of hot hatch. Subtle looks, four-wheel drive and a suave image mean the grown-up Golf doesn’t immediately shout about its potential. Yet while it speaks softly, the R carries a very big stick. Its 310hp 2-litre engine is positively punchy, but it’s the cast-iron composure and unflappable poise across switchback B-roads that really highlight that this is a car tinged with greatness. JD

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NSX Generations


NSX Generations


The NSX factor

The current Honda NSX is a brilliant machine, but could its US origins prevent it gaining the iconic status of its ancestor? Driving both in Tokyo – and spending time with people who live and breathe the original – should provide the answer

by Antony Ingram
Photography by Mark Riccioni

 A visit to renowned NSX tuning and time attack specialist Advance Garage should prove revealing on that score.

A visit to renowned NSX tuning and time attack specialist Advance Garage should prove revealing on that score.

 Tokyo locals give the new car a resounding thumbs-up, but what’s the view of hardcore NSX enthusiasts?

Tokyo locals give the new car a resounding thumbs-up, but what’s the view of hardcore NSX enthusiasts?

For just a moment I’m fourteen again, staring at the distinctive trapezoid tail lights of a Honda NSX.
Six small oblongs illuminated behind a band of red polycarbonate, joined by an extra sliver of LED light emanating from the trailing edge of the integrated spoiler with every tap of the brakes. I can just about hear the growl of its twin tailpipes over the mechanical gnashing behind me, reverberating off the long walls of every tunnel on Tokyo’s seemingly endless ribbons of expressway.
The reverb disappears as we emerge onto long raised stretches of road between monolithic apartment blocks, punctuated by the occasional flicker of light from an occupied room. Now and then we scythe across the metal span of a bridge, skyscrapers and a lone Ferris wheel lining the horizon as orange fades into hazy purple. In my head it’s a screenshot from Gran Turismo, rendered in 3D and with perfect clarity, one that takes me back to those evenings spent with PlayStation controller in hand, racing my brother to the finish line (and generally losing).
Right now, from my vantage point in the current NSX, the power advantage is all mine. But I’ve no idea where I’m going, and there’s not a single character I recognise on the satnav screen as it chirps back to me in a kawaii anime-girl voice: ‘Massugu itte, shingōde hidari ni magatte kudasai.’ Quite. Arigatou gozaimasu, but I think I’ll just follow. On a different day, though, 580hp would put me just a pedal-squeeze away from dominating the Bayshore Route Grand Prix…
Such are the fruits of two and a half decades of progress. The latest NSX is a bona fide supercar in all but bonnet emblem, where its predecessor only just scraped that definition – even if it did drop a dollop of wasabi into whatever it was that complacent European manufacturers were dining out on at the time. Porsche 964s and Ferrari 348s are appreciated today as characterful dips back into the history of their respective manufacturers – not to mention decent investments – but Honda’s all-aluminium, VTEC-engined arrival revealed them as unsophisticated anachronisms, relics from a time when flaws were considered an acceptable compromise for their performance.
The first NSX was lightweight, compact, and thoughtful. It’s become a cliché to say it was little more taxing to drive than a contemporary Civic, but it remains true. The steering is light, if not quite so friction-free and direct as a modern sports car’s, the forward visibility astonishing. By current standards, it’s also tiny, mainly in width. The analogue instruments are legible, the seats comfortable, and you can get in and out of it without having to clamber over a massive sill or through some dihedral-hexadecimal-logarithmical porthole.

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‘The new car feels smooth and seamless, but still isn’t quite as cool as the early-’90s icon slinking along in front’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s NSX must work harder to compete: 991s and 488s (and R8s and 570Ss) aren’t just blisteringly fast but everyday-useable. Supercars without compromise, just as the first NSX was back in 1990. Porsche, Ferrari and others have taken Honda’s USP and paired it with the heritage and showroom appeal that even their flaky ancestors never lacked.
Today’s approach is different, and New Sportscar eXperimental seems even more appropriate now than it did back then (actually, today it’s New Sports eXperience, but we’re sticking with the original backronym, thanks), with hybrid technology to assist the NSX’s twin-turbocharged V6, all-wheel drive, torque vectoring, and nine-speed dual-clutch gearbox. Big power, big torque, and big sophistication, plus a cabin that keeps the original’s simplicity while incorporating the necessary modern kit, and a sense of compact useability, even in Tokyo’s tightest streets, to body-shame a 991.
But the new NSX is hiding a dirty secret to those of us who grew up with a JDM schooling thanks to Gran Turismo and Tokyo Drift: it’s American. Its creases are the work of Acura’s Michelle Christensen and engineering was led by Ted Klaus; both American. The concept was first revealed at Detroit in 2012 and the production car debuted at the same show in 2015. It’s built not in Tochigi, like the original, but in Marysville, Ohio.
Car fans in Tokyo are either unaware of its American heritage or aren’t bothered. Parked up earlier, near the Kanda River –cheekily in front of Toyota’s headquarters – the new NSX attracted just as much attention as its ancestor. A businessman in a tailored brown suit stopped by to compliment the cars in broken English. I motioned as to which might be his choice – old or new? He pointed to the red car.
Blake Jones, owner of the older, Brooklands Green Pearl model in front and writer for car culture website Speedhunters, is also making positive noises when we park up on the other side of one of Tokyo’s many tollbooths (whose operators offer encouraging noises of their own each time we pull up). He tells me how fantastic the new car looks in his rear-view mirror. Not as good as his car looks above my squared-off wheel, I suspect, but he has a point.
The new NSX’s long gestation and numerous show appearances mean it’s a familiar shape now, but on a crisp late-October morning in Tokyo the NSX cuts a striking form. That might be down to the Valencia Red Pearl paintwork, or it might be the small oblong Japanese number- plate up front, which photographer Mark Riccioni has already noted improves the look of everything from the humble Honda Jazz to the evo-kryptonite Prius.
As with the original, the new car is surprisingly compact in the metal. It sits waist-high, and has the unmistakeable proportions of a supercar. The details of one, too, from the multi-element LED headlights and the mid-mounted V6 visible through the rear glass, to the mirrors out on stalks and the buttresses rising above the vents in the rear wings.

‘As with the original, the new car is surprisingly compact. It also has the unmistakeable proportions of a supercar’

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 Our man Ingram (on the right) chats to Advance proprietor Masa and early NSX owner Blake.

Our man Ingram (on the right) chats to Advance proprietor Masa and early NSX owner Blake.

But while one NSX owner might be impressed on first acquaintance, we have bigger sakana to fry. Blake is leading me to Advance Garage, one of thousands of tuning firms dotted across Japan and a particular specialist with the original NSX, building time-attack cars capable of lapping Tsukuba Circuit in under a minute – serious speed for a street-legal vehicle.
Our choice of venue may not be unrelated to Blake’s desire to swap a manual transmission into his automatic example in the near future.
There’s a little more highway to cover first, and it’s a mixed bag. At Tokyo’s languid traffic velocities, the new NSX is on hybrid duty, six-pot kicking in and out with throttle input, saving fuel at every opportunity. I appreciate the sentiment – it seems appropriate in a country where even the cheapest cars feature mild-hybrid tech and the dirt and clatter of diesel engines is largely absent – but Honda’s latest V6 isn’t as sonorous as before and at low cruising revs the sound is nothing more musical than a mechanical thrash. As with so many hybrids, petrol power feels like the weak link.
Blake, familiar with the roads, decides it’s time to step up the pace. Thank God sixty-odd isn’t the norm here. I’ve no intentions to join the Midnight Club, but Tokyo’s glassy-smooth asphalt and race-track-cambered turns invite a much faster flow. Bigger numbers begin to show on the TFT speedometer, and higher revs on the concentric tacho. Now the NSX feels happier. Sounds a bit more like a supercar – not a wail or a bellow, but purposeful, almost tuneful. Makes amusing turbo chuffing noises under heavy throttle and on the overrun. Still feels smooth and seamless. Still isn’t quite as cool as the early-’90s icon slinking along in front.
I clock the cars before I see the garage itself. Parked out on the street is a third-generation Mazda RX-7 wearing a few choice modifications and a glossy coat of black paintwork. Hidden behind is an S15 Nissan Silvia – a shape never sold in the UK – and up on the kerb is one of Advance’s most famous project cars, the yellow ‘Flatout’ demo NSX. The shop has owned it since 1997, originally buying it to develop parts of its own, and its visual distinctions include some faired-in headlights from a later car, a wide, custom bodykit, and a set of staggered Rays wheels tucked under the arches. Through the rear Plexiglas are visible six velocity stacks for individual throttle bodies, helping towards a naturally aspirated 340hp or so. Before I’ve even pulled up, proprietor Masa walks out with a big grin and motions me to park at a jaunty angle in front of the open entrance.
By Japanese standards, the Advance workshop is sizeable, but it’s still cosy enough that cars are perched on lifts not just to be worked on, but to allow space beneath to fettle other customer projects. A silver NSX is parked front and centre, also wearing a wide bodykit and a sizeable diffuser, while in front are two more, the first silver, with a pearlescent white example dangling its wheels above. To the side is a Bayside Blue metallic R34 Skyline GT-R waiting for R35 brakes, while up on the ramps are a Legacy and a 370Z hiding a serious-looking roll-cage and carbonfibre body panels. Little is for decoration; Advance customers use their cars on track. Several boast stickers from the nearby Fuji Speedway.
I want Masa’s take on the new car, but first he wants his mechanic to try it. I give him the thumbs-up. These guys are used to actual handbrakes and manual gearboxes, so I have to gesture towards the small circle marked D/M and the handbrake switch behind it. He then pulls away silently, which must be a novelty for Advance’s neighbours. After a spin around the block, Masa hops in and does the same. They’re all smiles. ‘It’s fast!’ they beam. Masa says one of his customers has a new NSX, but they only do basic maintenance on that, and it’s the first time either has had a drive. Up goes the (front) bonnet, revealing a chaotic space full of wires, hoses and subframes – not unlike the old car – then the rear clamshell pops and Masa stares past the pokey luggage area at the mostly-hidden V6. They peer and prod away, and Blake conveys their occasional message of approval.

 Not much front luggage space with either car.

Not much front luggage space with either car.

  Beautifully clear dials of early NSX

 Beautifully clear dials of early NSX

But is it a proper NSX? They aren’t so sure. With good humour but a hint of exasperation, Masa explains that it doesn’t feel like the old car. Neither to drive, nor in spirit. In fact, he says, it feels American. You don’t really need to rev the engine, he notes, the implication being that big, low-down torque (thanks to the electric motors) is a very American characteristic. Realistically, it also has a bit too much power for crowded Japanese roads. Great on track, he supposes, but not something you can exploit like you can with the original car.
Blake nods. ‘For the price I paid for my NSX, you can get a used R35 Nissan GT-R in Japan’, he says. ‘But that just doesn’t appeal to me.’ Everyone here –including myself, I concede – prefers the more accessible but also more involving performance of the earlier car. One word comes up over and over in conversation, and it’s a word I understand as the western motoring lexicon is absorbed into Japanese: digital. At the time,
the original NSX might have seemed inorganic next to some of its more boisterous rivals, but by modern standards – even considering steering that feels quite numb at lower speeds – the old car feels more like a living object next to the new NSX’s clinical, digital approach.
Would Advance Garage ever modify the new NSX? Some of Japan’s more visually orientated tuners have already tackled it, and the turbocharged engine certainly lends itself to even bigger numbers. Masa shakes his head. They’ve worked with the original NSX since the mid-’90s but, to him, the new car feels like an interloper. A remarkable supercar and, like the original, an impressive technical achievement. But not really an NSX.
I mull on this as Blake and I head to the Daikoku-Futo parking area to get a few last photographs. On Tokyo’s looping network
of expressways, roads highlighted in sodium vapour orange, the videogame vibes are stronger than ever. Street signs flicker
and perfectly painted road markings reflect vividly in the LED headlights’ glow, the early NSX still dancing, howling through
every tunnel.
Back when Gran Turismo debuted in 1997, it felt like a game that only Japan could produce.
Impossibly detailed, idiosyncratic, slightly geeky. It nevertheless won worldwide acclaim, changing the way people thought about and developed racing games. The latest in the franchise, Gran Turismo Sport, is a highly impressive, more refined, more bombastic product, with global ambitions in the face of stronger rivals. The parallels are clear. As with Gran Turismo, the NSX’s Japanese roots are beginning to fade.

With thanks to Blake Jones.

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HONDA NSX (1990)
Engine
V6, 2977cc
Power 274hp @ 7300rpm   
(255hp @ 6800rpm with auto ’box)
Torque 283Nmn @ 5400rpm  
Transmission Five-speed manual (four-speed auto option),
rear-wheel drive
Tyres 205/50 ZR15 front, 225/50 ZR16 rear
Weight 1365kg
Power-to-weight 204hp/ton
0-100km/h 5.8sec (claimed)
Top speed 270km/h (claimed)
Price new $388,888 (1990)
evo rating 4.5 stars

 

HONDA NSX (2017)
Engine V6, 3493cc, twin-turbo, plus 2 x 36hp front electric motors, and 47hp rear electric motor
Power 580hp (combined)   
Torque 645Nm @ 2000rpm (combined)  
Transmission Nine-speed dual-clutch, four-wheel drive, rear limited-slip differential
Tyres 265/35 ZR20 front, 325/30 ZR21 rear
Weight 1776kg
Power-to-weight 332hp/ton
0-100km/h 2.9sec (claimed)
Top speed 307km/h (claimed)
Basic price $928,999 without COE
evo rating 5 stars

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Penrite oil


Penrite oil


Penrite supports 70 years of 7s

One of Australia’s biggest motor oil brands proudly sponsors the 70th SCC International Rugby 7s

The Singapore Cricket Club proudly presents the 70th edition of the SCC International Rugby 7s (SCC 7s). By now, the tournament has become part of the fabric of Singapore’s sporting scene with participants coming from around the globe. It is in fact, one of the oldest Sevens tournaments in the world and the oldest organized sporting event in Singapore.

This year’s line-up will be no less with returning teams –  Tribe 7s from Australia, and Fijian favourites, Daveta. Expect to see the likes of international teams like France make a push for the Ablitt Cup titles as well.

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The tournament continues to draw participation from global development teams from Italy and France joining the myriad teams on the Padang. 70 years, and still one of the highlights of the Singapore sporting calendar – fun off the field as well with a dedicated kids area and largest Guinness Bar in South East Asia.

To be a part of this historic tradition, come to the Padang from November 3-5 and also visit our SCC 7s Facebook Page for more details. Penrite Oil Company, Australia’s biggest independent lubricants producer is a proud sponsor of SCC Rugby and its high quality products are available in Singapore from Chuan Leck Auto and from other Distributors throughout South East Asia. 

Get your tickets here.

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Nissan Note


Nissan Note


Nissan Note 1.2 DIG-S

The styling update of the 2017 Nissan Note gives us an opportunity re-discover how suitable this supermini is for Singapore’s roads.

When the Nissan Note was launched in Singapore around 2013, Certificate of Entitlement (COE) premiums were near the $80k mark that resulted in this car selling for around $140k. Today, this sum could buy a BMW 216d Active Tourer…

A softening of COE premiums along with a healthy $10k Carbon Emissions-based Vehicles Scheme (CEVS) rebate sees the sticker price of the Nissan Note lowered to the sub-$90k price point.

At this price point, a strong case can be made for the Note as punters would be hard-pressed to find a better new car for this money.

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Mercedes-AMG C 43


Mercedes-AMG C 43


Mercedes-AMG C 43 4Matic

A less manic but still impressive C-Class AMG could be the thinking man’s muscle car

They say you can’t be too thin or too rich but evidently there can be too much of a good thing these days. Have we reached a point in evolution where we are better off with less than we think we actually need?

It might be theoretically possible for example, to build a smartphone with a double quad core processor and 4k display and 64-bit digital audio converter but it’s going to have the shortest battery life and the heat it would generate would literally burn a hole in your pocket… Besides, if you’re only going to use it to watch YouTube videos, the four or six-inch screen simply isn’t big enough to display all those pixels, the tiny on-board speakers will never do the sound processor justice, and streaming a 4k video on the go won’t be doing your mobile data plan any favours.

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Porsche 911 R is evo Car Of The Year


Porsche 911 R is evo car of the year

When it comes to The Thrill of Driving, there is no better expression of this ethos than the Porsche 911 R. Watch this amazing car beat out 11 other contenders to the title in the official video.

 

Porsche 911 R is evo Car Of The Year


Porsche 911 R is evo car of the year

When it comes to The Thrill of Driving, there is no better expression of this ethos than the Porsche 911 R. Watch this amazing car beat out 11 other contenders to the title in the official video.

 

evo Car Of The Year video

12 cars, 7 judges, 5 days, thousands of miles and hundred of litres of super unleaded. Ladies and gentleman, this is evo Car of the Year. Starring: Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio, Aston Martin Vantage GT8, Audi R8 V10 Plus, BMW M2, BMW M4 GTS,
Ford Focus RS, Honda NSX, Lamborghini LP580-2, McLaren 570S, Mercedes-AMG C63 S Coupe, Porsche 911 R and
Volkswagen Golf GTI Clubsport S.

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BMW M3 sponsored feature


BMW M3 sponsored feature


The secret BMW M3s

In 1986, BMW took its humble 3 Series and transformed it into a performance icon. Five generations later,
the German carmaker is still at it. We take a look at the M3 from its beginnings and some secret variants you
may not have heard of.

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Park&Go


Park&Go


Park&Go@SG app for iOS Arrives

iPhone users can now use Continental’s ground-breaking parking app

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New Metal


New Metal


Civic Celebration

Kah Motor launches the 10th generation Honda Civic in Singapore

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Advantage Porsche


Advantage Porsche


Advantage Porsche

For the second consecutive year Porsche has become the official automotive partner of the prestigious BNP Paribas ‘WTA (Womens Tennis Association) Finals Singapore presented by SC Global 2016.’

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Porsche 718 Boxster Unveiled at Gala Event


Porsche 718 Boxster Unveiled at Gala Event


PORSCHE 718 BOXSTER UNVEILED AT GALA EVENT

Perhaps it was fitting that the fourth generation Porsche Boxster – now dubbed the 718 Boxster – was revealed at the enormous sound stage of Singapore’s Infinite Studios.
Like a gala movie night, the star of the show was the all-new fourth generation 718 Boxster and Boxster S models that, for the first time, have broken tradition with the previous Boxster engineering philosophy of mid-mounted six cylinder ‘boxer’ engines.

 

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GTA Spano Showcases Graphene Technology


GTA Spano Showcases Graphene Technology


GTA SPANO SHOWCASES GRAPHENE TECHNOLOGY

The world’s first hypercar to combine the exotic graphene material along with carbon fibre comes, no less, from Spain and has premiered at its new locally-appointed dealership EuroSports Global.

Only 99 GTA Spano models will be built and no one car will be finished in the same colour. That gives it a level of exclusivity surpassing even the mighty Bugatti Veyron and upcoming Chiron supercars.

 

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Contiental


Contiental